If you thought Season 4 of “Game of Thrones” was tough on the bruised and brooding Jon Snow – friends dead, girlfriend dead, White Walkers imminent — things are about to get worse. And for a man still recovering from an attack that included, say it with me, giants on mammoths, that’s saying something. Kit Harington dropped by The Times studio having survived Monday’s San Francisco premiere, where he got to see fellow cast members, many of whom he has never shared a scene with

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For those who couldn’t watch the premiere due to the time difference, I found a video from it which has been uploaded online which features short red carpet interviews with the cast et al. Pictures from it will be uploaded shortly along with new photoshoot additions :]

I watched this last night after stumbling across it by accident and it is a wonderful Q&A session that Kit took part in some months back. There is a super cute moment at round about the 20 minute mark. Hope you guys all enjoy it!

Although Kits past shoot for British GQ has been used in this issue it’s still nice to see him on another front cover. Check out the digital scans in the gallery

 Gallery Link:
GQ Australia [+008]

Scans of this interview are circulating around the internet but want to wait to bring you guys better quality ones so for now enjoy and excerpt from it

Kit Harington has hinted he will have a major storyline in Game of Thrones season five. The British actor revealed he was on set more than any other cast member during filming in Belfast, suggesting Jon Snow could be at the centre of a pivotal plotline. Speaking to The Independent Magazine, he said he was “on set every day in Belfast. And I had more dates than anyone this year – I was f*cking there”.
Harington, who currently stars in the Vera Brittain film The Testament  of Youth, also said he “can’t be Jon Snow forever” and would like to break out into producing. The British actor revealed he was on set more than any other cast member during filming in Belfast, suggesting Jon Snow could be at the centre of a pivotal plotline. Speaking to The Independent Magazine, he said he was “on set every day in Belfast. And I had more dates than anyone this year – I was f*cking there”.

Harington, who currently stars in the Vera Brittain film The Testament  of Youth, also said he “can’t be Jon Snow forever” and would like to break out into producing. “I’m wanting to move into producing. I’ve kind of set my cogs going on that. It’s one of those things: before whenever it is that I finish Thrones, I need to really process what I want to do next. And eventually it may not be acting. I love it, but I need to make sure that’s what I want to do.”

He added that he was a “f*cking workaholic” and would need a big project to focus on after finishing Game of Thrones – whenever that will be. “Even now, having finished [filming] Thrones, and having a whole day off, I just can’t deal with it. I need to work.”

Read the full interview with Kit Harington on Saturday 17 January in The Independent Magazine

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When we meet him, Kit Harington is all in black and lounging on a hotel room sofa in his socks (“all Vuitton shoes,” he says later, “are uncomfortable, apparently”) after enjoying the premiere of Testament of Youth, which took place the previous evening, “maybe a little too much.”

He won’t be pushed on why he enjoyed the premiere too much, unfortunately – maybe because, after the huge success of Game of Thrones, he’s very aware of giving journalists too much to jump on.
Suffice to say, when we suggest that he might be longing for the end of the day so that he can have a drink, his denials are swift.
Rather than Game of Thrones (although we will get to that later) or his possibly hungover state, though, we’re here to discuss the big screen adaptation of Vera Brittain’s generation-defining memoir, in which Harington is bringing to life the writer’s lost fiancé, Roland Leighton.
Kit’s character is dreamlike and often distant from protagonist Vera – both physically, on the Front Line, and in his words, which were recounted in her memoir 15 years after the war had ended.
This eerie, dreamlike nature is deliberately drawn by James Kent’s direction, which brings an idyllic quality to the pre war years and an apocalyptic sense to the years of fighting, reflecting the fact that the entire source text was a memory. Opposed to her slain brother and fiancé Vera appears solid and whole, with a much more defined voice. How did Kit go about creating a character who, really, was nothing more than a memory?

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